[-$71,637] Are There Financial Benefits to Being ‘Single AF’?

It is safe to say that I am single AF, hence the title of this blog.
I know right?! Finally, truth in advertising!

All joking seriousness aside, it’s good to know that others in my situation are managing to find a faint silver lining to the cloud that is our sad lives…and that lining might be financial.

First, let’s face it. For those of us who are in debt, being single makes getting out of debt even more of a struggle. Couples simply have more money to throw at debt. They can lean on each other for financial security in the event of job loss, etc. Plus sharing a house / apartment  and living expenses with an SO or spouse provides a significant step up in quality of life vs. living with rando roommates. Need I go on? There are many, many financial advantages to being in a relationship.

There may also be, however, a few benefits to being single when paying off debt. Gasp! Did I just say that? Well, it depends on how you want to look at things.  Read More

[-$71,595] Independence Day

Happy 4th of July!

I’ve decided to go back to making semi-monthly payments. Waiting an entire month to see my balance drop was feeling excruciatingly slow. I think this way will keep me more motivated.

Expenses are going up

Fireworks aren’t the only thing going up these days. Read More

[-$72,452] Student Loan Conqueror?

Hey Peeps!

Time seems to be flying by. I’ve been on an information diet for the last two weeks and feel a lot better. Really. If any world shaking event happens, I’ll hear about it from other people. Apart from that, I’m avoiding the news media for now.

Student Loan Conqueror!

Shout out to Liz @ Less Debt More Wine for featuring my story as a part of her Student Loan Conqueror series. It was fun to participate. If you have student loan debt, I’d encourage you to check out the other profiles and take advantage of the advice they’ve shared, as I have.   Read More

[-$75,003] Where Your Tax Dollar Went

Source: nationalpriorities.org

In my Being Single is Taxing post, I hoped that all the money being ripped ‘liberated’ from my paychecks was being spent wisely. I recently stumbled across this breakdown, which confirmed my fears.

According to Nationalpriorities.org, from every collected tax dollar we spend nearly 30 cents on health care, almost 24 cents on military/defense, but less than 4 cents on education and science (research and exploration) combined.  Read More

[-$74,897] BlogLines: “I Hate Having Roommates.”

This is the second post of my BlogLines series where I share quotes that I’ve collected from other blogs or websites that resonate with me around a topic or a ‘line’. This week’s theme… “I hate having roommates”.

[My first BlogLines post: “…and I have nothing to show for it.”]

I wish I could write in more detail about my housing situation, and I have had a few longstanding requests from you guys to do so, but can’t risk it because the people involved are 1) familiar with the internet and 2) capable of doing certain things like…reading. So, I’ll have to stick to generalities for a while longer.

First, let me clarify that I don’t hate my roommates as people, at all. I just hate having to live with roommates at this point in my life. I wish I could afford my own place. The fact that I may have to wait up to 3 more years to do that is depressing.

I’ll be the first to admit that when paying off debt, renting a room instead of having your own place can do wonders for your budget, but there are downsides to living with roommates in our thirties and beyond.  Read More

I’m Worthless: from -$142,598 Net Worth to Zero

This is a big milestone for me. I’m completely worthless, guys….  FINALLY! 🙂

I now have a positive net worth for the first time in my entire adult life.

When I started this blog, I was in a ton of debt and didn’t have a dime of savings. Don’t believe me? See the crime scene for yourself.

November 2012 Net Worth

April 2017 Net Worth

Today, I have a small (and growing) retirement fund and have almost halved my total debt.

. Read More

[-$77,295] Being Single is Taxing

So, if you are in the U.S., I hope you’ve all paid your taxes by now. If not, you’re juuuust about out of time. The clock is ticking, peeps. Get on it!

I paid a LOT in taxes this year, as usual. Most of it, I hope, is going to various good causes, but it still is frustrating to see that money disappear forever.

I’ve seen a few blog posts by bloggers with families proud of paying little or no taxes. Between marriage, having a kid (or three), and home and other tax breaks / benefits / deductions, they are living well. Good for them. As a single person who qualifies for, seemingly (based on my recent tax return), no breaks or benefits of any kind, my spend on taxes feels disproportionate and unfair.  Read More

[-$79,700] I’m in the 70’s! It’s Groovy!

love-70s

Yeah, I’m Stayin’ Aliiiiiiiiiiiiiive!  Break out the 8-tracks!

I hadn’t expected to get here this soon! Best. Tax. Refund. Ever. Wicked!

I finally feel like things are starting to shift with this debt. Can you dig it?

Current stats from my lender:

Read More

[-$83,290] In the Papers

On Valentine’s Day, I toyed around with the idea of re-upping this post about being awkwardly single in the workplace or something equally as snarky, but, sigh, I didn’t get around to it.

Imagine my surprise when I saw this while perusing the interwebs…

…an article posted both on MarketWatch and the NY Post featuring a couple of quotes from yours truly!

I was interviewed for this months ago and had forgotten about it. Seems timely that it would post on Valentine’s Day.

Provocative NY Post title aside, give it a read. Is it junk or truth? Share your thoughts.

ny-post-article-2017

marketwatch-article-2017

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“Debtor’s prison is real, and opportunity cost is a bitch.” (DDSW) [Link to Archive]

[-$83,896] My Bonus, Health Goals, and a Plan of Attack

money-and-health

First, the good news.

I finally got my 2016 bonus check ($4,922)! Woot!!   I now have ALL the money! lol

i-have-all-the-money

This is how I have allotted it.

  • Health maintenance fund ($2,500)
  • Opportunity fund ($1,250)
  • Emergency fund ($222)
  • Checking account / slush ($500)
  • Evil Student Loan extra payment ($500)

I also made my first $2,650 monthly mega payment (up from $2,300).  The resulting balance ($83,896) barely looks like it’s even moved since last month. Still pretty much in the mid-80’s.

Why is so much going to my health fund?  Keep reading… Read More